Double Gazebo by Native Art Department International

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Created by artist collective Native Art Department International (NADI), Double Gazebo (Markham) is a temporary public artwork newly commissioned by the City of Markham’s Public Art Program and presented in partnership with the Varley Art Gallery of Markham.

Now on view through November 28, 2021
Outdoor courtyard,
Varley Art Gallery of Markham
216 Main Street Unionville, Markham

In parallel with the physical installation, NADI has also programmed a series of online activations titled Walk East for Sun Rise Walk West for Sunset. These five-part activations —With ARs, With Artists, With Movement, With Sound, With Star Knowledge—will be launched here on the first day of each month from July through November.


Double Gazebo (Markham) comprises two intersected structures modeled on a traditional gazebo, and is 11 feet in height. The installation offers partial shelter while simultaneously acting as a platform for shared experiences and an awareness that our bodies exist in and occupy space. It is important to note that the paired structures presented here are understood to be intersected, not combined or conjoined, which emphasizes the fact that one cannot alter or remove one part without destroying the other.


The artwork is intended to reflect broader debates regarding social spaces of exchange, interaction, and land use. Using social spaces as a point of departure, Double Gazebo expands on the concept by constructing something that operates both as inside and outside, to foster an interaction between the concept of space and occupation.


A gazebo can be considered a rather conservative structure, but it is a familiar type, prevalent in the community in which it is installed. Double Gazebo intentionally disregards colonial definitions of what Indigenous art and design elements should look like. Instead, it calls into question the concept of "categorized aesthetic" in terms of both expression and self-representation.


An artwork needs to be activated to become public. Walk East for Sun Rise Walk West for Sunset is a series of five-part online activations: With ARs, With Artists, With Movement, With Sound, With Star Knowledge.The design of the program is partly to address the related issues of social distancing and public art at this special time. Furthermore, it acts as a conceptual bridge to connect with its variant installation Double Gazebo (MOCA) that will be on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto from September 29, 2021 through January 9, 2022.


Created by artist collective Native Art Department International (NADI), Double Gazebo (Markham) is a temporary public artwork newly commissioned by the City of Markham’s Public Art Program and presented in partnership with the Varley Art Gallery of Markham.

Now on view through November 28, 2021
Outdoor courtyard,
Varley Art Gallery of Markham
216 Main Street Unionville, Markham

In parallel with the physical installation, NADI has also programmed a series of online activations titled Walk East for Sun Rise Walk West for Sunset. These five-part activations —With ARs, With Artists, With Movement, With Sound, With Star Knowledge—will be launched here on the first day of each month from July through November.


Double Gazebo (Markham) comprises two intersected structures modeled on a traditional gazebo, and is 11 feet in height. The installation offers partial shelter while simultaneously acting as a platform for shared experiences and an awareness that our bodies exist in and occupy space. It is important to note that the paired structures presented here are understood to be intersected, not combined or conjoined, which emphasizes the fact that one cannot alter or remove one part without destroying the other.


The artwork is intended to reflect broader debates regarding social spaces of exchange, interaction, and land use. Using social spaces as a point of departure, Double Gazebo expands on the concept by constructing something that operates both as inside and outside, to foster an interaction between the concept of space and occupation.


A gazebo can be considered a rather conservative structure, but it is a familiar type, prevalent in the community in which it is installed. Double Gazebo intentionally disregards colonial definitions of what Indigenous art and design elements should look like. Instead, it calls into question the concept of "categorized aesthetic" in terms of both expression and self-representation.


An artwork needs to be activated to become public. Walk East for Sun Rise Walk West for Sunset is a series of five-part online activations: With ARs, With Artists, With Movement, With Sound, With Star Knowledge.The design of the program is partly to address the related issues of social distancing and public art at this special time. Furthermore, it acts as a conceptual bridge to connect with its variant installation Double Gazebo (MOCA) that will be on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto from September 29, 2021 through January 9, 2022.


  • With AR (Markham)

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    Click HERE for an interactive experience of With AR (Markham), a virtual supplement to Double Gazebo (Markham). Please note it is designed for mobile devices only.

  • With Artists

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    Coming soon. Launch on August 1, 2021.

  • With Movement

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    Coming soon. Launch on September 1, 2021.

  • With AR (MOCA)

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    Coming soon. Launch on September 29, 2021.

  • With Sound

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    Coming soon. Launch on October 1, 2021.

  • With Star Knowledge

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    Coming soon. Launch on November 1, 2021.