Food Security & Sustainability

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Food for physical, mental, emotional and cultural wellbeing is a priority to secure and sustain our future. We need locally grown traditional and world foods, with a focus on food growing, healthy cooking and composting. Understanding and working to strengthen the connections between food, farming, economy, health and the environment are Greenprint priorities for the City of Markham.

Food insecurity has increased and local agencies have seen an increase in demand for food resources like food banks, seed libraries, food shares, and food boxes.

New Community Garden in Ward 7!

The City of Markham is excited to partner with York Region Food Network (YRFN) to create a new community garden space in Ward 7 for the 2022 growing season. YRFN will host meetings and practical workshops to help bring the group together in the first season.

The new Community Garden will be located at 120 Kirkham Drive. It will have its own water supply, tool shed and fence. Community gardens are spaces governed by a community group, where planning, planting, growing, maintenance and harvesting is done collaboratively. This new hub will welcome local residents who want to garden together and will also host gardening workshops for the entire community.

This project is supported by a grant from the Canadian Healthy Communities Initiative, Safe and Vibrant Public Spaces stream as well as funding from the City of Markham.

This new garden will be situated next to the existing allotment plots at Kirkham that are leased to individual families.

If you'd like to get involved in this community garden or learn more about this project, please contact us.

Garden Master Plan - 120 Kirkham Drive

The City of Markham is also developing a Master Plan to guide the future of this garden. Check back for more information and to contribute to the community consultation program in early 2022.

Food for physical, mental, emotional and cultural wellbeing is a priority to secure and sustain our future. We need locally grown traditional and world foods, with a focus on food growing, healthy cooking and composting. Understanding and working to strengthen the connections between food, farming, economy, health and the environment are Greenprint priorities for the City of Markham.

Food insecurity has increased and local agencies have seen an increase in demand for food resources like food banks, seed libraries, food shares, and food boxes.

New Community Garden in Ward 7!

The City of Markham is excited to partner with York Region Food Network (YRFN) to create a new community garden space in Ward 7 for the 2022 growing season. YRFN will host meetings and practical workshops to help bring the group together in the first season.

The new Community Garden will be located at 120 Kirkham Drive. It will have its own water supply, tool shed and fence. Community gardens are spaces governed by a community group, where planning, planting, growing, maintenance and harvesting is done collaboratively. This new hub will welcome local residents who want to garden together and will also host gardening workshops for the entire community.

This project is supported by a grant from the Canadian Healthy Communities Initiative, Safe and Vibrant Public Spaces stream as well as funding from the City of Markham.

This new garden will be situated next to the existing allotment plots at Kirkham that are leased to individual families.

If you'd like to get involved in this community garden or learn more about this project, please contact us.

Garden Master Plan - 120 Kirkham Drive

The City of Markham is also developing a Master Plan to guide the future of this garden. Check back for more information and to contribute to the community consultation program in early 2022.

  • Canada’s Food Price Report 2021

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    Canada’s Food Price Report 2021 predicts annual food expenditure could go up by as much as $695 compared to 2020

    COVID-19 changes consumer behaviour and affects food prices in surprising ways

    Halifax — The 11th annual edition of Canada’s Food Price Report forecasts an overall food price increase of 3 to 5% for 2021. The most significant increases are predicted for meat at 4.5 to 6.5%, bakery at 3.5 to 5.5%, and vegetables at 4.5 to 6.5%.

  • World Soil Day

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    Did you Know?

    1. World Soil Day (WSD) is held annually on 5 December as a means to focus attention on the importance of healthy soil and to advocate for the sustainable management of soil resources. It encourages governments, organizations, communities and individuals around the world to commit to proactively improving soil health.
    2. Soil is a living resource, home to more than 25% of our planet's biodiversity.
    3. It is estimated that only 1% of soil microorganism species are currently known compared to 80% of plant species
    4. Up to 90% of living organisms live or spend part of their lifecycle in soils.
    5. Soil organisms can break down certain contaminants.
    6. Plants nurture a whole world of creatures in the soil that in return feed and protect the plants. This diverse community of living organisms keeps the soil healthy and fertile. Soil pollution decreases the fertility of the soil.
    7. Soil degradation over large areas may threaten food security.
    8. Current research indicates that soil biodiversity can be maintained and partially restored if managed sustainably.
    9. Biodiversity supports human and societal needs, including food and nutrition security, energy, development of medicines and pharmaceuticals and freshwater, which together underpin good health. It also supports economic opportunities, and leisure activities that contribute to overall wellbeing.
    10. A soil rich in biodiversity is better able to control pests, since it contains both a range of predator species and a varied supply of nutrients.


    Biodiversity in your Backyard – Tips and Tricks

    1. Naturalize your lawn
    2. Plant native species
    3. Remove exotic plants
    4. Grow heritage varieties and save seeds
    5. Don’t use chemicals
    6. Plant and garden organically
    7. Compost


    Additional Resources

    1. World Soil Day 2021
    2. Biodiversity in Your Backyard
    3. Managing Your Soil
    4. York Region Food Network's Compost Learning Hub video
  • Community Gardens, Growing Strong in Sault Ste. Marie

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  • Scarborough residents transform vacant lot into community garden and hub

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    Deborah Newton, Toronto Star, September 9, 2021

    Read article here

  • School gardens and kitchens could grow with Ontario’s proposed food literacy act

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    The Conversation, University of Guelph, May 18, 2021

    Alicia Martin, PhD Student, Geography, University of Guelph

    Amberley T. Ruetz, Ph.D. Candidate in Geography and Arrell Food Scholar, University of Guelph

    Read article here

  • “I plowed the field myself while my dog trotted alongside”: How this Toronto woman turned a hydro field into a thriving community farm

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    Anna-Marie Burrows, a volunteer with the Malvern Family Resource Centre, helped create a two-acre urban farm, plowing the field herself, fighting for permits and recruiting farmers.

    Read article here by Toronto Life.

  • Ontario Declares Community Gardens Essential Source of Fresh Food

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    The province amended its emergency order to re-open community gardens

Page last updated: 17 January 2022, 11:49