Home Energy Retrofits

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
Save money Improve home comfort Protect the planet
Lower your electricity and gas bills by investing in energy upgradesCool and heat spaces efficiently by using the right insulation
Reduce your carbon footprint by consuming less energy


Energy Efficiency For Homes

Homes and buildings are the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Markham today, accounting for 49% of total emissions. Within the residential sector, emissions are mainly a direct result of fuel consumption for space and water heating.

Home energy retrofits create more sustainable homes through improvements to the building shell and energy system. These upgrades can lower your heating and energy bills, improve home comfort and reduce emissions.

How it Works

Energy advisor examines window

The EnerGuide home evaluation uses a nationally recognized rating system to assess the energy performance of your home.

A certified energy advisor will examine your home's insulation, heating and cooling systems and overall energy use to identify sources of heat loss and other energy savings. After your audit, you will receive a set of recommended changes that have the best energy retrofit impact.

A number of grants and financing options are available to help cover the costs of upgrades.

For more information on rebates and incentives, please see our FAQs.

Get Started Today!

On this page, you will find a variety of resources to help you complete a home energy retrofit.

We invite you to share your ideas, stories and questions with the community in the space below.

Save money Improve home comfort Protect the planet
Lower your electricity and gas bills by investing in energy upgradesCool and heat spaces efficiently by using the right insulation
Reduce your carbon footprint by consuming less energy


Energy Efficiency For Homes

Homes and buildings are the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Markham today, accounting for 49% of total emissions. Within the residential sector, emissions are mainly a direct result of fuel consumption for space and water heating.

Home energy retrofits create more sustainable homes through improvements to the building shell and energy system. These upgrades can lower your heating and energy bills, improve home comfort and reduce emissions.

How it Works

Energy advisor examines window

The EnerGuide home evaluation uses a nationally recognized rating system to assess the energy performance of your home.

A certified energy advisor will examine your home's insulation, heating and cooling systems and overall energy use to identify sources of heat loss and other energy savings. After your audit, you will receive a set of recommended changes that have the best energy retrofit impact.

A number of grants and financing options are available to help cover the costs of upgrades.

For more information on rebates and incentives, please see our FAQs.

Get Started Today!

On this page, you will find a variety of resources to help you complete a home energy retrofit.

We invite you to share your ideas, stories and questions with the community in the space below.

  • Here's what you need to know about Canada's new home retrofit program

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Find out more about the Canada Greener Homes Grant, a new program that provides homeowners with up to $5,600 in energy upgrades.

    Click here to read the full article by Global News.

  • How to make the most of that new, federal, 'green' home retrofit grant

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Find out more about the pros and cons of the new rebate program and useful tips for homeowners.

    Click here to read the full article by CBC News.

  • Federal government to pay $5,000 for home energy retrofits

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Learn more about the application process for the federal government's latest retrofit grant.

    Click here to watch the full video by CBC News.

  • 10 ways to green your home

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Learn tips on how to make your home greener and the positive impact it can have on the planet.

    Click here to read the the full article by the Toronto Star.

  • Resident Testimonial: Gradual Energy Upgrades

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image


    Goal: Decrease energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and utility costs


    About the Experience

    Overall, the experience went pretty well. We’ve replaced inefficient equipment with high-efficiency alternatives over several years including our heating and cooling systems, water heater, appliances, plumbing fixtures, and lighting.

    Some of the building envelope improvements include reducing air leakage (weatherstripping, caulking windows, foam inserts in exterior outlets, spray foam gaps between the interior and exterior of the house), increasing attic insulation, passive heating and cooling (window dressings, opening windows, deciduous trees for shade in the summer and reduced wind in the winter), and fans to help circulate air and exhaust warm air in the summer.

    Simple low-cost energy conservation improvements included turning equipment and lights off when not in use, setting back thermostat overnight, hang drying laundry, using the air-dry feature on the dishwasher, low-flow faucets/shower heads, duel-flush toilets, etc. We’ve also improved controls through a smart thermostat, motion sensors, lighting dimmer switches, and timers for washroom exhaust fans. Lastly, we’ve added a solar PV system to our roof that feeds electricity back into the grid.


    Benefits

    The benefits are enormous and include fresher indoor air, more comfortable living environment and room temperatures (less drafts and hot/cold pockets), more options/better control of equipment and remote access to our heating/cooling system, utility bill cost savings, and more.


    Challenges

    There were some challenges along the way. I strongly recommend having a qualified energy advisor complete an energy audit that will recommend improvements with estimated savings and rebates. From there, I’d recommend reading product selection and installation guides (if available), learning the benefits and drawbacks of the high-efficiency technology, always requesting at least 3 supply/install quotes, asking as many questions as you’d like to feel comfortable with the project, and withholding final payment until the project is completed to your satisfaction.


    - Amanda

  • Rooftop solar power is on the rise, but Canada has yet to embrace its sunny ways

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Canada has a significant amount of available roof space, land and sunlight. However, rooftop solar power is often overlooked as a source of energy.

    Click here to read the full article by CBC News.

  • Federal government will pay up to $5,000 if you make your home more energy efficient

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The government of Canada recently launched a new program that offers Canadians grants of up to $5,000 for energy-saving home upgrades.

    Click here to read the full article by CBC News.

  • Markham community will use geothermal in all its homes, but some critics aren't hot on it

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The City of Markham has partnered with Mattamy Homes and Enwave Energy Corporation to build what is believed to be the largest district geothermal system in Canada. Over 300 homes in the Berczy Glen neighbourhood will be powered using heat from deep within the earth.

    Click here to read the full article by CBC News.

  • Canadian communities are tapping into greener ways to heat and cool buildings

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Markham District Energy's Markham Centre system has helped build resiliency and improve energy efficiency in the community.

    Learn more about the transition away from individual heating and cooling systems towards a single, central system. Click here to read the full article by CBC News.

  • Resident Testimonial: Doors & Insulation

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    supporting image

    “I didn’t realize that a poorly sealed door could cost us so much more in lost energy. Replacing our door with an Energy Star Certified door looks great and saves us money! ” - Lisa

    A properly sealed building envelope saves energy and improves comfort. Gaps in poorly fitted and damages doors allows outside air to get in, and inside air to get out. It can also allow unwanted bugs and small critters to enter the house.


    BEFORE


    AFTER


Page last updated: 22 October 2021, 12:07